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Blog: Life On The Edge

Single-pilot submersible on display at the Seattle Aquarium

Single-pilot submersible on display at the Seattle Aquarium

Now through next Tuesday, May 28, the Aquarium is displaying a single-pilot submersible, the DeepWorker, in the hallway between the Crashing Waves and Life on the Edge exhibits.

Opalescent nudibranch

New nudibranchs at the Seattle Aquarium

Nudibranchs, members of the sea slug family, come in an amazing variety of shapes and colors. Several outstanding specimens were recently placed on exhibit at the Aquarium’s Closer Look table: the opalescent nudibranch, Hermissenda crassicornis; the alabaster or white-lined nudibranch, Dirona albolineata; and the Monterey sea lemon, Doris montereyensis.

Are Basket Stars, Sea Stars?

Are Basket Stars, Sea Stars?

The basket star, Gorgonocephalus eucnemis, is basically a fancy brittle star. After attaching to a rock or other firm substrate, an adult basket star will spread its five intricately branched arms into the water to catch tiny zooplankton (crustaceans, arrow worms, and sometimes fish larvae and jellies). Hooks on the arms snag the prey items which are then rolled up in mucus strings within the tiny branchlets.

Critter News: Scary and Slimy Sea Stars

Critter News: Scary and Slimy Sea Stars

The morning sun star (Solaster dawsoni) eats its own kind. It can swallow small prey whole, but will evert its large stomach to feed on larger sea stars. So, how does it capture and hold onto sea stars that may be larger than itself?

Critter News: Mystery Animals

Critter News: Mystery Animals

I look like I have a crew-cut on my head, but  some of my relatives are much more heavily decorated..

Critter News: Scallops, Chitons, Sea Stars and Sea Urchins

Critter News: Scallops, Chitons, Sea Stars and Sea Urchins

What am I?
I am one of about 60 of what you see in the photo on the left. I may help my possessor see danger nearby or good habitat further off.

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