Skip to main content

Blog: exhibit

Kelp poacher

New animals at the Aquarium's Closer Look table

A recent collecting trip to Neah Bay has brought some fascinating new critters to our Closer Look table—including a few that are lesser known and fantastically camouflaged. Come get to know them during your next visit to the Seattle Aquarium!

<img class="size-large wp-image-5915 alignnone" title="Pacific spiny lumpsucker" src="http://blog.seattleaquarium.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Pacific-spiny-lumpsucker-edited-1024x674.jpg" alt="Pacific spiny lumpsucker" width="640" height="421" /></a>  <a href="http://blog.seattleaquarium.org/marine-animals/pacific-spiny-lumpsucker/attachment/sony-dsc-26/" rel="attachment wp-att-5917"><img class="alignright wp-image-5917" title="Pacific spiny lumpsuckers" src="http://blog.seattleaquarium.org/wp-content/up

Pacific spiny lumpsuckers are back!

Always fun to watch and looking a bit like swimming golf balls, Pacific spiny lumpsuckers, Eumicrotremus orbis, have returned to our Puget Sound Fish exhibit. These odd fish get their names from an interesting feature: a sucker disk that they use to adhere to kelp, rock and other surfaces—which helps them resist the strong pull of marine currents. Weak swimmers, their camouflage helps them avoid detection by predators.

Harlequin shrimp: tiny, tough reef predators

Harlequin shrimp: tiny, tough reef predators

This pair of harlequin shrimp, Hymenocera elegans, are feeding on a portion of a sea star in their Ocean Oddities exhibit. As an obligate feeder, this tropical shrimp preys exclusively on sea stars (although some observers note that they may nibble on the tube feet of sea urchins) in the Indo-Pacific region.

Marine Mammal Monitoring Begins: Volunteers Needed

Marine Mammal Monitoring Begins: Volunteers Needed

With the renovation of our harbor seal exhibit officially underway, the timing is just right for a complementary project devoted to marine mammals in the wild. We’re happy to announce the launch of our Marine Mammal Monitoring project, and you’re invited to volunteer!

Construction alert: last chance to see our harbor seals for a while!

Construction alert: last chance to see our harbor seals for a while!

We’re about to embark on an exciting transformation of our harbor seal exhibit—which means that Barney and Siku will need to make their homes elsewhere for the time being. Come see them before they’re transferred to their temporary residence at the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium on October 2!

New Sculpins on Display

New Sculpins on Display

In the picture above, the manacled sculpin displays two of its distinctive features: the united pair of pectoral fins and the protuberance on the lower lip (function unknown).

Are Basket Stars, Sea Stars?

Are Basket Stars, Sea Stars?

The basket star, Gorgonocephalus eucnemis, is basically a fancy brittle star. After attaching to a rock or other firm substrate, an adult basket star will spread its five intricately branched arms into the water to catch tiny zooplankton (crustaceans, arrow worms, and sometimes fish larvae and jellies). Hooks on the arms snag the prey items which are then rolled up in mucus strings within the tiny branchlets.

Critter News: 3 New Cassin's Auklets at the Aquarium

Critter News: 3 New Cassin's Auklets at the Aquarium

A first for the Seattle Aquarium — 3 Cassin’s Auklets, a new species for our collection, recently arrived from SeaWorld Orlando and are now on exhibit with the rest of our Alcid collection.

Subscribe to the Seattle Aquarium Blog

Get news and updates from the blog delivered to your inbox