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Blog: conservation

Orca update: Actions you can take to #RememberTahlequah

We all love our local southern resident orcas, but they continue to struggle as they face ongoing strain on their local habitat and food supply. The Seattle Aquarium along with numerous local leaders, researchers, conservationists and partners from the Orca Salmon Alliance are advocating for greater protections for this iconic species and the salmon they depend on for food.

Orca update: The grieving process is over but we all have work to do

We at the Aquarium wanted to give a brief update on what is happening and share some news on steps the Orca Salmon Alliance has taken and what policy leaders are doing to help save this iconic species.

Lend your voice to help save our beloved orcas

We have all been gripped by the heartbreaking images of our Southern resident orca Tahlequah (also known as J35) as she mourned the death of her calf this past week. At the Seattle Aquarium we are all grieving along with the rest of the world. And though we are sad, we are viewing this as a wakeup call around the health of the Salish Sea and our mission of Inspiring Conservation of Our Marine Environment.

Seattle Aquarium diving birds get a thumbs up from the doctor

Seattle Aquarium diving birds get a thumbs up from the doctor

Routine checkups are important for everyone—including the animals at the Aquarium. Recently, our bird & mammal team conducted routine checkups for all 15 of the alcids that call the Seattle Aquarium home.

How many octopuses are in Puget Sound? Census seeks to answer questions about the remarkable giant Pacific octopus.

How many octopuses are in Puget Sound? Census seeks to answer questions about the remarkable giant Pacific octopus.

The giant Pacific octopus (GPO) is the largest octopus species in the world—yet little is known of its biology and ecology. Nor is it possible to know exactly how many GPOs are living in Puget Sound.

Seattle Aquarium research in Hawaii part 1: reef surveys

Seattle Aquarium research in Hawaii part 1: reef surveys

Wish you had a reason to travel to Hawaii during Seattle’s chilly and wet winters? Then you might envy the Seattle Aquarium biologists who travel to the west coast of Hawaii’s Big Island every winter to conduct annual reef surveys, a research project that launched in 2009.

Jeff Renner's report from the D.C. People’s Climate March

Jeff Renner's report from the D.C. People’s Climate March

Ocean acidification and climate change go hand in hand. Just as excess burning of fossil fuels leads to unhealthy changes in Earth’s one ocean, it also creates undesirable changes in the world’s atmosphere. Learn more about ocean acidification and carbon footprint—plus the Aquarium’s sustainability efforts—on our website.

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