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Chinook salmon

PROTECT BRISTOL BAY

Last Friday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers cleared the way for permitting a huge mine at the headwaters of two major rivers that feed into Bristol Bay, Alaska—home to the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery and one of the most prolific Chinook salmon runs.

The Canadian-owned Pebble Limited Partnership (“Pebble”) would extract gold, copper and molybdenum—materials of extremely high value, found in everyday items such as seatbelts, cell phones and electrical wires—through a new open pit mine.

The Seattle Aquarium strongly opposes the Bristol Bay Pebble Mine. Healthy oceans, fishing and Indigenous communities and local economies depend on wild and clean rivers and waterways. These will all be harmed if the Pebble Mine is developed.

Showing 1-12 of 19 Blog Posts

Know your beach-this week from the beach

As we gear up for our Cedar River Salmon journey this fall, we are taking a look back at some of the highlights of our 2018 Beach Naturalist season. It was another great one that went by much too quickly!

Know your beach—this week from the beach

Take a walk north of the Seattle Aquarium along the waterfront. There is something you should know about this little beach right in downtown Seattle - it is alive with wonderful neighbors that breathe water instead of air! 

Know your beach-this week from the beach

#7 in the 2018 series of guest blog posts by Seattle Aquarium beach naturalists Bobby Arispe and Jen Strongin.

Seattle Aquarium first winner of AZA volunteer engagement award

Seattle Aquarium first winner of AZA volunteer engagement award

The Seattle Aquarium is proud to announce that our Beach Naturalist program is the very first winner of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Innovation in Volunteer Engagement Award. The award was developed to recognize achievement in volunteer program development; programs were judged by their ability to engage volunteers in the overall mission and operation of the organization. 

What are the impacts of volunteering at the Seattle Aquarium?

What are the impacts of volunteering at the Seattle Aquarium?

As part of National Volunteer Appreciation Week, April 6–12, we’re sharing thoughts from some of the volunteers who participated in a recent internal survey about their volunteer experience. 

Celebrating Seattle Aquarium volunteers during National Volunteer Appreciation Week

Celebrating Seattle Aquarium volunteers during National Volunteer Appreciation Week

Every year, literally hundreds of dedicated, passionate people give their time to the Seattle Aquarium—prepping food for our animals, answering questions from our many visitors, and furthering our mission of Inspiring Conservation of Our Marine Environment. In 2013 alone, 1,380 volunteers donated 96,800 hours to our institution!

Orlay Johnson, Volunteer Diver at the Seattle Aquarium

Longtime Seattle Aquarium volunteer retires from NOAA after 30 years

Orlay Johnson has been involved with the Seattle Aquarium for the past 32 years: first as a volunteer, then as a staff member (in a now-defunct position called “Tour Guide”), and again as a volunteer after he began his 30-year career at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

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