Press room

Find news and recent press releases about the Aquarium.

November 22, 2017

Santa returns to dive at the Seattle Aquarium!

When: Saturdays—Mondays, November 25—December 24

Where: Seattle Aquarium, 1483 Alaskan Way, Pier 59, Seattle, WA

What:
Come to the Aquarium and get in the spirit for the winter holidays! See Santa diving in the 120,000-gallon Window on Washington Waters exhibit. Bring your camera, take your picture with Diving Santa and stay perfectly dry! Or have your photo taken by our professional photographer so the whole family can be in the picture. Treat yourself to a seasonal beverage at our café’s espresso bar. Enjoy special holiday concerts featuring local Puget Sound groups on Saturdays and Sundays at 1pm.

November 25—Caspar Babypants
November 26—Emerald City Voices
December 2—Dickens Carolers
December 3—Northwest Girlchoir
December 9—Recess Monkey
December 10—Sound Point Duo
December 16—The Not-Its!
December 17—Dickens Carolers
December 23—Caspar Babypants
December 24—Dickens Carolers

Donations will be accepted to help fund DreamNights at the Seattle Aquarium—evenings dedicated to bringing children who have disabilities, are chronically ill or who have special needs to the Aquarium for a special night of exploring the undersea world in a safe and relaxed atmosphere.

Hours/prices at the Aquarium:
The Aquarium’s admission gate is open 9:30am to 5pm daily, with the exhibits closing at 6pm. Admission fees: Adults $29.95; Youth (4–12) $19.95; Children 3 and under are admitted free. Holiday Hours: Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Eve open 9:30am to 3pm, with the exhibits closing at 4pm. Closed Christmas Day.

On the web: SeattleAquarium.org
On Facebook: facebook.com/Aquarium.Seattle
On Twitter: twitter.com/SeattleAquarium

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Contact:
Tim Kuniholm
(206) 386-4345
t.kuniholm@seattleaquarium.org


November 2, 2017

Beached Oregon Sea Turtle Signals Start of Stranding Season in the Pacific Northwest

The stranding of an endangered Olive Ridley sea turtle on the Oregon Coast in mid-October offers a reminder that the typical season for sea turtle strandings is beginning. Beachgoers should watch for stranded turtles and report them through an available hotline so trained responders can help rescue the animals, if necessary.

An initial call to the Oregon Marine Mammal Stranding Network at about 6 pm. October 21 reported an adult female Olive Ridley sea turtle stranded alive near Salishan, Oregon. The Oregon network is part of the West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network, coordinated by NOAA Fisheries. The OSU network coordinator, Jim Rice, responded to the report and, with the help of local residents, collected the turtle from the beach. No Oregon facilities were available to take the turtle, so Rice transported the turtle to Kelso, WA where he transferred it to SR3 (SeaLife Response, Rehabilitation and Research) for transport to the Seattle Aquarium, where it remains for long-term care and rehabilitation.

The turtle is currently in guarded condition but has been showing signs of gradual improvement with the help of supportive care, gradual warming, antibiotics, and other medications. She remains weak and emaciated but the Seattle Aquarium team is doing everything possible to bring her back to good health.

Olive Ridley sea turtles are one of the most abundant species of sea turtles in the world, but are protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. While Olive Ridleys are most abundant in warm tropical waters, the frequency of strandings may suggest they are more common off the Oregon and Washington coast than originally thought. Sea turtles do not typically come ashore unless they are hypothermic, sick, or injured. Strandings occur most often in late fall and early winter, when ocean conditions shift and sometimes trap turtles in colder water. Cold water debilitates sea turtles by reducing their body temperature, leaving them unable to swim and feed and more susceptible to currents that can carry them ashore. 49 sea turtles have stranded in Washington and Oregon over the past 10 years.

Trained responders take stranded sea turtles to an authorized rehabilitation facility, in this case the Seattle Aquarium, where they are treated for hypothermia and assessed for any underlying illness or injury. Since sea turtles are listed under the Endangered Species Act, rehabilitation facilities must be permitted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Treating and rehabilitating sea turtles is a lengthy process that typically takes about 8-10 months. Once recovered, healthy turtles are typically released back into the wild in more southern waters.

If you find a sea turtle on shore please report it immediately to the West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network at 1-866-767-6114. This hotline is monitored 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and the Network will respond as quickly as possible to your report. The Network includes organizations throughout Washington, Oregon and California.

For more information on what to do if you find a sea turtle on the beach, please visit: http://usfwspacific.tumblr.com/post/96478074645/qa-why-your-help-is-needed-when-sea-turtles-wash

For further information on the protection of sea turtles, visit:
http://usfwspacific.tumblr.com/post/164836970160/why-save-sea-turtles

For more details on the West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network, please visit:
http://www.westcoast.fisheries.noaa.gov/protected_species/marine_mammals/stranding_network.html

Public Affair contacts for additional information:
Tim Kuniholm
Seattle Aquarium
(206) 386-4345
t.kuniholm@seattleaquarium.org

Elizabeth Materna
USFWS
(503) 231-6912
Elizabeth_Materna@fws.gov

Michael Milstein
NOAA
(503) 231-6268
Michael.Milstein@noaa.gov


November 2, 2017

Discover Science with the Seattle Aquarium!

When: November 2017

Where: Seattle Aquarium, 1483 Alaskan Way, Pier 59, Seattle, WA

What:
Science & Cocktails: Lightning Talks, November 8, 6–10pm

Join us for a fun evening at the Seattle Aquarium featuring fascinating, five-minute glimpses into the latest marine and ocean science from local scientists and science enthusiasts. From Falling for Blondie, a 12-Feet-Tall, Green-Eyed Beauty to How to Enjoy Sushi without Getting Infested by Parasites, there is sure to be a topic that catches your interest. After the main event, head to our Life on the Edge exhibit to chat with our presenters, enjoy dessert bites and sip a nightcap!

$25 general admission, $20 member admission; includes light hors d’oeuvres and dessert bites. Cash bar.

Discover Science Weekend, November 10–12
Bring the family to explore science together through exciting interactive experiments and presentations. Meet scientists and researchers from the Aquarium as well as other organizations in the community to learn about current projects, as well as why and how the research is being conducted.

Gills Club, November 12, 2–3:30pm
The Gills Club is Atlantic White Shark Conservancy's STEM-based education initiative dedicated to connecting youth with female scientists from around the world, sharing knowledge, and inspiring shark and ocean conservation. The Seattle Aquarium is your local Gills Club host meeting site! Meetings are held on select Sundays and open to Seattle Aquarium and Gills Club members, youth ages 6–12; must be accompanied by an adult, families welcome.

To learn more and register, visit SeattleAquarium.org/public-programs.

Hours/prices at the Aquarium:
The Aquarium’s admission gate is open 9:30am to 5pm daily, with the exhibits closing at 6pm. Admission fees: Adults $29.95; youth (4–12) $19.95; children 3 and under are admitted free.

On the web: SeattleAquarium.org
On Facebook: facebook.com/Aquarium.Seattle
On Twitter: twitter.com/SeattleAquarium

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Contact:
Tim Kuniholm
(206) 386-4345
t.kuniholm@seattleaquarium.org


September 19, 2017

Seattle Aquarium welcomes Brian Skerry to SeaChange fundraiser

SEATTLE—On Tuesday, October 10, the Seattle Aquarium will hold its fifth annual fundraising breakfast benefiting conservation and research. Held at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel, this year’s SeaChange features Brian Skerry—internationally recognized National Geographic magazine photographer. Skerry will share his gripping portrait of the ocean as a place of beauty and mystery, a place in trouble and ultimately, a place of hope that will rebound with the proper attention and care. For almost two decades, Skerry has explored environments of extreme contrasts—from tropical coral reefs to diving beneath polar ice. In 2010, National Geographic named one of Brian’s images among their “50 greatest photographs of all time.”

“We are thrilled to have Brian Skerry as our keynote speaker for SeaChange,” said event chair Eric Steinwinder. “His powerful photography epitomizes the need to take action on behalf of ocean health—and fits perfectly with the Seattle Aquarium’s work to inspire conservation action in every individual we reach.”

SeaChange information:
Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Sheraton Seattle Hotel, 1400 6th Avenue
Suggested minimum donation: $150
RSVP deadline: September 29
Registration: SeattleAquarium.org/SeaChange

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About the Seattle Aquarium
The Seattle Aquarium is one of Washington state’s leading environmental education and stewardship institutions, and the region’s gathering place for discussion and sharing information about marine conservation. It maintains a number of research initiatives in cooperation with federal, state, zoological and university partners. The Aquarium is located on Pier 59, at 1483 Alaskan Way.

On the web: SeattleAquarium.org
On Facebook: facebook.com/Aquarium.Seattle
On Twitter: twitter.com/SeattleAquarium

Contact:
Tim Kuniholm
(206) 386-4345
t.kuniholm@seattleaquarium.org


September 15, 2017

Enjoy a fall and winter full of family fun with the Seattle Aquarium!

WHEN:
September 2017–January 2018

WHERE:
Seattle Aquarium, 1483 Alaskan Way, Pier 59, Seattle, WA

WHAT:
Sea Otter Awareness Weekend, September 23–24
Join biologists at the Seattle Aquarium and explore the lives of sea otters. See how the Seattle Aquarium biologists care for these enchanting animals, including providing great nutrition, training and even toys!

Toddler Time
From dressing up like a wolf eel to fish-print painting and water play with ocean animal toys, Toddler Time keeps even the busiest of bodies engaged and entertained with developmentally age-appropriate, hands-on activities.
Toddler Time takes place in our classrooms on select Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays. Children ages 5 and under must be accompanied by an adult. FREE with Aquarium admission.

Drop in for any length of time between 9:30am and noon
October 8–10 and 29–31
November 5–7 and 12–14
December 3–5 and 10–12
January 7–9 and 21–23
February 4–6 and 11–13

Cedar River Salmon Journey: every weekend in October
FREE family-friendly salmon viewing programs
Follow salmon up the Cedar River this October! Watch our local salmon spawning, learn about their adventures and the things we can all do to improve watershed health. Volunteer naturalists will be stationed from 11am to 4pm on October 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22, 28 and 29 at four locations along the Cedar River in the Renton and Maple Valley areas. Carpool if you can—these sites have limited parking. For a flyer with directions or to get more information visit SeattleAquarium.org.

Halloween fun at the Seattle Aquarium, October 28–29
Get your Halloween celebration started early! Put on your costume and join us for creepy games and activities, face painting, fun treats and two kinds of pumpkin carving demonstrations—on land with master carver Russ Leno and underwater with our Aquarium divers. Trick or treat at additional waterfront locations on Sunday, October 29, noon–4pm.

Discover Science Weekend, November 10–12
Bring the family to explore science together through exciting interactive experiments and presentations. Meet scientists and researchers from the Aquarium as well as other organizations in the community to learn about current projects, as well as why and how the research is being conducted.

Lightning Talks
Discover Science Weekend kickoff event
Wednesday, November 8, 7–10pm at the Seattle Aquarium.

Diving Santa, Saturdays and Sundays, November 25–December 24
Come to the Aquarium and get in the spirit for the winter holidays! Meet Diving Santa, take a photo and treat yourself to a seasonal beverage at our café’s espresso bar. With special holiday concerts featuring local Puget Sound groups on select weekends. Be sure to bring your camera!

Winter Fishtival, December 26–January 1
Join us for hands-on activities, special talks and opportunities to learn more about the marine animals at the Aquarium and in Puget Sound. Each day will feature a different sea animal and activities. Included with Aquarium admission; no reservation necessary.

Hawaii in Your Own Backyard, January 13–15
Take a break from winter, dress up in Aloha wear, and join us at the Aquarium to explore a little of the tropics. Discover some of the unique sea life that originates only in the Hawaiian Islands.

Hours/prices at the Aquarium:
The Aquarium’s admission gate is open 9:30am to 5pm daily, with the exhibits closing at 6pm. Admission fees: Adults $29.95; Youth (4–12) $19.95; Children 3 and under are admitted free.

On the web: SeattleAquarium.org
On Facebook: facebook.com/Aquarium.Seattle
On Twitter: twitter.com/SeattleAquarium

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Inspiring Conservation of Our Marine Environment.

Contact:
Tim Kuniholm
(206) 386-4345
t.kuniholm@seattleaquarium.org


August 16, 2017

NINETEEN TOP U.S. AQUARIUMS JOIN FORCES TO TACKLE GROWING PLASTIC POLLUTION THREAT FACING OCEAN, RIVERS, GREAT LAKES

Aquariums from coast to coast shift away from single-use plastic products and packaging, rally consumers to build market demand for innovative alternatives


The Seattle Aquarium has joined forces with 18 other aquariums across the United States and created a new Aquarium Conservation Partnership (ACP) to address one of the gravest threats facing ocean and freshwater animals: plastic pollution. The ACP announced the launch of a nationwide consumer campaign and a business commitment to drive a shift away from single-use plastic among their visitors, in their communities and beyond.

“The public trusts aquariums to do what’s right for the health of the ocean and for ocean wildlife,” said Julie Packard, executive director of the Monterey Bay Aquarium. “We’re just beginning to understand the full impacts of ocean plastic pollution on ecosystems, marine life and human health. But we already know enough to say that now is the time to act.”

Through the national “In Our Hands” campaign, the ACP hopes to empower their 20 million visitors and millions more in their communities to drive a national shift away from single-use plastic and toward innovative alternatives. The campaign includes a website that inspires visitors to make positive, everyday behavior changes and raise awareness of the issue.

All 19 aquariums are also supporting this shift away from single-use plastic within their own businesses. As of today, all ACP members have eliminated plastic straws and single-use plastic take-away bags in their institutions and, in hopes of additional plastic reduction, the aquariums have committed to showcasing innovative alternatives to single-use plastic in their facilities. The Seattle Aquarium has also eliminated plastic beverage lids and containers.

“As leaders in aquatic conservation, aquariums are expected to walk their talk, and that’s exactly what this partnership is meant to do,” said National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli. “We are uniquely qualified to set an example for others—in reducing our plastic footprint, encouraging sustainable operating practices, and inspiring hope in a public that is hungry to be part of the solution. We’re right where we should be.”

About 8.8 million tons of plastic enters the ocean each year worldwide—roughly a dump truck full of plastic every minute of every day. In the United States alone, plastic waste averages more than 200 pounds per person each year. If nothing changes, by 2025 the flow of plastic into the ocean is expected to double. But it’s not just the ocean that’s affected: Plastic pollution in lakes and rivers has been found at levels as high, or higher, than in oceanic gyres that concentrate plastic trash. Today, there are an estimated one billion plastic particles floating on the surface of Lake Michigan alone.

This summer, the aquariums will focus on raising awareness, sparking consumer action and sharing their own success stories to highlight the many ways they’ve cut back on single-use plastic in their operations.

They are working with business partners to showcase innovative alternatives to single-use plastic products, and will collaborate with vendors to accelerate design of new products and materials.

The aquariums are also using their collective voice—at the local, state and national level—to support policies that reduce the flow of plastic pollution into the ocean, rivers and lakes. Beyond sponsoring clean-up events and education programs, many have backed successful efforts to stem the use of plastic shopping bags and plastic microbeads found in personal care products.

“The Seattle Aquarium is committed to leading by example” stated Jim Wharton, Seattle Aquarium’s director of conservation education. “On June 1, we eliminated plastic straws, lids and beverage bottles from the building. Of course, we moved away from plastic bags years ago. We believe this will spark conversations with our guests and inspire our community to join us. Choosing alternatives to single-use plastics is one of the many ways the Aquarium lives its ocean ethic.”

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About the Seattle Aquarium
The Seattle Aquarium is one of Washington state’s leading environmental education and stewardship institutions, and the region’s gathering place for discussion and sharing information about marine conservation. It maintains a number of research initiatives in cooperation with federal, state, zoological and university partners. The Aquarium is located on Pier 59, at 1483 Alaskan Way.

About the Aquarium Conservation Partnership
The Aquarium Conservation Partnership (ACP) is a collaboration of 19 AZA-accredited public aquariums across North America committed to advancing conservation and advocacy of the world’s oceans, lakes and rivers through public action, business leadership and policy changes aimed at addressing major threats to aquatic environments. It was first championed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California, National Aquarium in Baltimore and Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, in collaboration with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

Photo, video and graphic assets
High-resolution photos, video and graphic assets can be downloaded from the following link. Captions and credit information are included: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9o9d9whgx5kzrvk/AAAB7mPsHoWcvl5L6JA1K4v2a?dl=0

On the web: SeattleAquarium.org
On Facebook: facebook.com/Aquarium.Seattle
On Twitter: twitter.com/SeattleAquarium

Contact:
Tim Kuniholm
(206) 386-4345
t.kuniholm@seattleaquarium.org

Laura Austin
(206) 386-4329
l.austin@seattleaquarium.org


July 14, 2017

KING5 News: Seattle Aquarium ditches plastic straws

Click here to view the article/video.


July 12, 2017

CURBED Seattle: Seattle Aquarium is getting a massive new building

Click here to view the article.

 

 

Press releases